The Flower of the Chapdelaines by George W Cable Page 1 of 198

The Flower of the Chapdelaines


I
Next morning he saw her again.

He had left his very new law office, just around in Bienville Street, and had come but a few steps down Royal, when, at the next corner below, she turned into Royal, toward him, out of Conti, coming from Bourbon.

The same nine-year-old negro boy was at her side, as spotless in broad white collar and blue jacket as on the morning before, and carrying the same droll air of consecration, awe, and responsibility. The young man envied him.

Yesterday, for the first time, at that same corner, he had encountered this fair stranger and her urchin escort, abruptly, as they were making the same turn they now repeated, and all in a flash had wondered who might be this lovely apparition.


Of such patrician beauty, such elegance of form and bearing, such witchery of simple attire, and such un-Italian yet Latin type, in this antique Creole, modernly Italianized quarter - - who and what, so early in the day, down here among the shops, where so meagre a remnant of the old high life clung on in these balconied upper stories - - who, what, whence, whither, and wherefore?

In that flash of time she had passed, and the very liveliness of his interest, combined with the urchin's consecrated awe - - not to mention his own mortifying remembrance of one or two other-day lapses from the austerities of the old street - - restrained him from a backward glance until he could cross the way as if to enter the great, white, lately completed court-house.

Then both she and her satellite had vanished.



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