Castle Richmond by Anthony Trollope Page 2 of 559


"See," he would muse, "how cunningly the creature works, now back to his earth, anon stealing an unsuspected run across country, the clever rascal;" and his ethical disapproval ever, as usual, with English critics of life, in the foreground, clearly enhanced a primitive predatory instinct not obscurely akin, a cynic might say, to those dark impulses he holds up to our reprobation. This self-realization in his fiction is one of Trollope's principal charms. Never was there a more subjective writer.

Unlike Flaubert, who laid down the canon that the author should exist in his work as God in creation, to be, here or there, dimly divined but never recognized, though everywhere latent, Trollope was never weary of writing himself large in every man, woman, or child he described.

The illusion of objectivity which he so successfully achieves is due to the fact that his mind was so perfectly contented with its hereditary and circumstantial conditions, was itself so perfectly the mental equivalent of those conditions. Thus the perfection of his egotism, tight as a drum, saved him.


Had it been a little less complete, he would have faltered and bungled; as it was, he had the naive certainty of a child, to whose innocent apprehension the world and self are one, and who therefore cannot err.

ALGAR THOROLD.


CONTENTS.


I. THE BARONY OF DESMOND.
II. OWEN FITZGERALD.
III. CLARA DESMOND.
IV. THE COUNTESS.
V. THE FITZGERALDS OF CASTLE RICHMOND.
VI. THE KANTURK HOTEL, SOUTH MAIN STREET, CORK.
VII. THE FAMINE YEAR.
VIII. GORTNACLOUGH AND BERRYHILL.
IX. FAMILY COUNCILS.



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